Copywriting

Win of the Week: The Power of Unspoken Benefits

January 04, 2012 Posted In: Copywriting Comments: 2

Take a look at the two ads below. Imagine you've got a job interview lined up. Maybe it's the first job interview you've had in years. You want to brush up on your skills -- maybe even get a "sneak peek" of the questions you'll be asked. So you start looking for job interview questions and answers. Which ad do you click on?

 

PPC Ad #1
Ad #1 - Job Interviews
PPC Ad #2
Ad #2 - Job Interviews

 

The ads are fairly unique. The URLs are the same, but everything else is different. Which ad do you think generated more than twice as many clicks?

Made your decision?

The winning ad is ad number two. It was written by BoostCTR writer "WordWizard," and it increased CTR by 164%. Where the original ad was getting 1 click, the new ad is getting 2.6 clicks, more than DOUBLE the original ad's performance.

So why did the new ad win? And why did it win by so much? I think it's pretty clear...

There are two different approaches here. One ad sells the thing being searched (job interview questions); the other one sells the thing being searched PLUS emotional relief!

The Original Ad

The original ad is not bad. In fact, if you are a job searcher, wouldn't you prefer to have job interview questions and answers customized for you... based on your background and the job you're seeking?

This is the promise made by the original ad: personalized job interview questions and answers.

My only criticism of the original ad is that it's wordy. Since the body of the ad is a single sentence, it's difficult for the brain to digest it quickly. Read it out loud to yourself and you'll see what I mean.

Because of its wordiness, the original ad is only able to sell one thing: personalized answers for job interviews. The ad doesn't have room to include any extra promises or benefits.

The Winning Ad

The winning ad uses both the title and the first line of body copy to deliver what the searcher is looking for. The searcher has typed in "job interview questions" or "job interview answers," and that's exactly what the ad promises to deliver. So on the keyword level, the new ad is stronger.

But that's not all!

Because the copy is succinctly written, it takes up only two lines of copy, leaving the last line for something extra. That "something extra" is the promise to "Calm Your Nerves."

As you can imagine, people who are looking for a job get nervous during job interviews. It's uncomfortable to be interviewed because you feel like you're being judged with every word you say.

So what may seem like a trivial detail -- "And How to Calm Your Nerves." -- gives the new ad a very strong emotional appeal.

Tap into People's Emotions

Just because somebody searches for one thing doesn't mean that's the only thing they're looking for.

Very often, people will search for "the thing," rather than the benefit they ultimately want. So give them the thing they're looking for, but also give them the unspoken benefit.

If you can do this, the searcher will feel as if you've read her mind. She'll respond by clicking your ad.

What do you notice about this ad contest? Feel free to leave a comment below.

By the Way...

The BoostCTR writers are chomping at the bit to improve your ads. They've collectively spent thousands of hours improving pay-per-click ads on both Google and Facebook. They increase CTR and conversions by 30% on average, sometimes as much as 164% or more. Best part: You can put 'em to work... risk-free for 30 days!

ryan-healy About the Author: Ryan Healy is a direct response marketer and BoostCTR writer. Since 2002, he has worked with scores of clients, including Alex Mandossian, Terry Dean, and Pulte Homes. He writes a popular blog about copywriting, business growth, and lifestyle design.

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Comments

Wednesday January 04, 2012

Ray (not verified) Said:

If an SEO reseller would look at those two ads, the one on the right would definitely take the cookie because it promises an extra benefit for the person who clicks it. Customers like to have that kind of service from the companies they go to.

Friday January 06, 2012

Béate Vervaecke (not verified) Said:

If most search queries contain the search term "job interview" it's obvious why nr. 2 wins. No other reason to look for. 

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