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Bing's Marketing Strategy Includes Comment Spam?

September 14, 2017

Lately we’ve been getting the occasional spam comment (according to my spam comment taxonomy, they’re mostly of the “full-on-ass-kissing” variety) that looks like a typical spam comment in almost every way:

  • It expresses some irrelevant but positive sentiment like “Thanks, this post was really helpful to me, keep it up”
  • It’s attributed to a normal-sounding name like “Carrie” or “Dave” (much more effective than something like “Cheap Canadian SEO” which will always get you flagged)
  • The name links back to the spammer’s site

The difference is, instead of linking to a deep page on some spammy domain I’ve never heard of (you know, something like memphis-internet-marketing.biz/link-building-services), they link to the Bing homepage. Yes, http://www.bing.com/. (There’s your link, Bing, big whoop.)

So my question is … really? This is Bing’s SEO strategy? Comment spam? Because if people aren’t using Bing, surely it’s not because they lack domain authority (although, admittedly, they still rank behind Dogpile in a Google search for “search engine”…)

Bing Comment Spam

And surely no-follow comment links aren’t going to push them to the next level of market share. So what is going on here? It would be one thing if someone who happens to work at Bing were leaving substantial comments of some relevance or interest. But they're contentless, and they've been attached to different names.

Has anyone else been getting comment spam from Bing?

Elisa Gabbert

Elisa Gabbert is WordStream's Sr. Manager of Content Marketing and SEO. Likes include wine, karaoke, poker, ping-pong, perfume, and poetry.