AdWords Tips

AdWords Releases Super-Sized Ad Text Headlines

By Larry Kim February 09, 2011 Posted In: AdWords Tips Comments: 1

Breaking News: Google has this week modified their ad headline format giving you yet another reason to care about Quality Score. The new ad headline may display twice as much information as before, combining both your headline and description line 1 fields, into one super-big headline (with its larger, bolder font) where it’s most likely to be noticed.

This change in ad text headline format only affects high Quality Score ads that appear above the search results on Google. Additionally, it will only super-size your ad text if each line appears to be a distinct sentence and ends in the proper punctuation. The headline and description line 1 will be separated by a hyphen. Now, some top placement ads will have even longer, more eye-catching headlines. Here's just one example of the longer ad text format for high quality score ads:

Longer Headlines for High Quality Score Text Ads on Google AdWords

So in summary, I think that:

  • It's a small ad text change but hey, I'll take any edge I can to get more visibility over competing text-ads, especially in competitive search verticals like "life insurance". In the above screenshot, see how much the Accuquotelife.com Ad really stands out relative to the other ads. They included a period after the "Compare Rates and Save up to 70%.", where as reliaquote.com did not include a period after "Compare Life Insurance Quotes".
  • The ad looks more like an organic SERP, which already displays the longer headline. This may trick more people into not realizing the difference and clicking on paid results.
  • It's yet another benefit of optimizing your campaigns for higher Quality Score, something that I strongly agree with.
  • Going forward, consider not writing those ad texts that use the entire headline, description line 1 and description line 2 fields as one big run-on sentence!
  • Instead, consider ending your description line one with a period, question mark or exclamation mark.
  • And of course, (shameless plug) check out our PPC Tools for Quality Score optimization so you can take advantage of this longer ad text headline that is only available for high quality score ads!

(More: Revisiting the Economics of Quality Score: Why QS Is Up to 200% More Valuable in 2013)

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Comments

Friday February 11, 2011

Ajijic Guy (not verified) Said:

Wow, thanks for this tip. I just started using AdWords. I just wrote a new ad for one of my ad groups based on this info. Is there any consensus on how/why/when ads appear above the search results in the first place? I have one campaign targeting the US, for which there's less than 7 or 8 advertisers advertising for my main keyword. That results page has no advertisers above the search results. However, in a different campaign I have targeting a different country (for the same main keyword), there ARE adverts above the search results. However, in this second campaign there are even less advertisers... just five or so it appears. I thought that the ads above the search results appeared when there's more than one page of ads and advertisers. I suppose my guess is incorrect? Thanks again for the article; I'm bookmarking your blog.

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